rebellion of the three feudatories against the Manchu throne in China, 1673-1681
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rebellion of the three feudatories against the Manchu throne in China, 1673-1681 its setting and significance by Kai-fu Tsao

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • China -- History -- K ang hsi, 1662-1722.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Kai-fu Tsao.
ContributionsWu, San-kuei, 1612-1678., Keng, Ching-chung, d. 1682., Shang, Chih-hsin, d. 1680.
The Physical Object
Pagination206 leaves :
Number of Pages206
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14291183M

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The Revolt of the Three Feudatories, also known as the Rebellion of Wu Sangui, was a rebellion in China lasting from to in the Qing dynasty (–) during the early reign of the Kangxi Emperor (r. –). The revolt was led by the three lords of the fiefdoms in Yunnan, Guangdong and Fujian provinces against the Qing central government. China--History--Rebellion of the Three Feudatories, Please provide your name, email, and your suggestion so that we can begin assessing any terminology changes. Fields denoted with an asterisk (*) are required. The Kangxi Emperor (5 February – 20 December ), given name Xuanye, was the third Emperor of the Qing dynasty, and the second Qing emperor to rule over China proper.. The Kangxi Emperor's reign of 61 years (from until ) makes him the longest-reigning emperor in Chinese history (although his grandson, the Qianlong Emperor, had the longest period of de facto power) and . Revolt of the Three Feudatories () Against Qing that Sangui started, 8 year long civil war, Spanned southern regions of China, Defeating Wu was long and difficult, Entire Wu family was exterminated, Kanxi remembered as greatest of Qing monarchs.

() The Three Feudatories were territories were bestowed by the early Manchu rulers to Wu Sangui and two other generals. They began to disregard orders from Beijing and elect own officials. Revolted in name of "overthrowing Qing and restoring Ming," but in . The Manchu conquest of China was a long period of war between the Qing Dynasty, established by Manchu clan Aisin Gioro in Manchuria (contemporary Northeastern China), and the Ming Dynasty of China in the , Aisin Gioro leader Nurhaci commissioned a document entitled the Seven Grievances in which he enumerated seven grievances against the Ming and began to rebel against .   Ever since their conquest of China in the 17th century, most of the Manchu had lived in comparative idleness, supposedly a standing army of occupation but in reality inefficient pensionaries. All through the 19th century the dynasty had been declining, and, upon the death of the empress dowager Cixi (), it lost its last able leader. In the emperor Puyi was a child, and the regency was. Anti-Qing sentiment (Chinese: 反清; pinyin: fǎn Qīng) refers to a sentiment principally held in China against the Manchu ruling during the Qing dynasty (–), which was accused by a number of opponents of being barbarian. The Qing was accused of destroying traditional Han culture by forcing Han to wear their hair in a queue in the Manchu style.

  The War of the Three Feudatories, Kangxi took power when he and his first challenge was integrating the southwest into the rest of his domain, because it was a hard area to control and he didn’t have enough loyal people to administer it; he left it under the control of Wu Sangui, Shang Kexi and Geng Jimao, the “Three. The Three Feudatories Rebellion (Sānfān zhī Luàn 三藩之亂) breaks out in China. (Details.) Zhèng Jīng 郑经 / 鄭經 assists the rebellion. Taiwanese leader Zhèng Kèshuǎng 鄭克塽, grandson of Zhèng Chénggōng 鄭成功 surrenders. Revolt of the Three Feudatories: A rebellion lasting from to in the Qing dynasty (–) during the early reign of the Kangxi Emperor (–). The revolt was led by the three lords of the fiefdoms in Yunnan, Guangdong, and Fujian provinces against the Qing central government. The Qing or Manchu dynasty was founded in by the Manchus, who were originally named the Jurchens, and the founders of the Jin dynasty. The rise of the Qing Empire started with a military.